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By Missy Ryan and , The last time there were fewer than 100 detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was Jan. 16, 2002. That month, shortly after the military prison opened, detainees in orange jumpsuits arriving from overseas locations were forced onto their knees in outdoor pens. Their wrists were bound, their hands covered with mittens. To isolate the men from their surroundings, their eyes were covered and they wore industrial earmuffs. It became an enduring image of the excesses of America’s response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. This week, with the expected resettlement of 10 Yemeni detainees, the prison population will once again dip below 100, this time symbolizing President Obama’s sprint to close Guantanamo before he leaves office. During his final State of the Union speech on Tuesday, Obama said that closing the prison at Guantanamo Bay would set a positive example for the rest of the world. “It is expensive, it is unnecessary, and it only serves as a recruitment brochure for our enemies,” Obama said of the prison. “There’s a better way.” With its history of hunger strikes, harsh treatment and byzantine military court proceedings, Guantanamo Bay is now tied up with Obama’s legacy as much as it is with that of George W. Bush, who sent hundreds of prisoners there. On his first day in office, Obama promised to close the prison, but his plans have been held up for years amid internal disagreements and steadfast opposition in Congress. After this…