Global Crime Case: Cybercrime and Counterfeiting
 
Members of an international organized crime group operating a “phishing” scheme in the United States, Canada, Pakistan, Portugal, and Romania obtained private information for credit-card fraud. Among the financial institutions affected were Citibank, Capital One, JPMorgan Chase, Comerica Bank, Wells Fargo, eBay, and PayPal.

Much of the modern organized crimes are very similar to the old. The most significant transformation from the streets to cyberspace has enlarged the territory of individuals and organized groups.

Enabled by the Internet, criminals can operate in cyberspace where less governance, a transnational stage, and a multitude of transactions to monitor complicate surveillance and enforcement. From counterfeiting drugs and software to identity theft and credit-card fraud, illegal transactions are increasingly infiltrating legitimate businesses where counterfeited goods and money laundering are buried in the billions of legitimate computer transactions made daily around the globe.

Counterfeited products are rising through global distribution via Internet sites. According to the World Health Organization, 50 percent of the medicines sold online are counterfeit.

The expanse of international criminal activity has been followed with an increase in prosecution through cooperating international law enforcement agencies willing to join the fight against globalized crime.

The following sampling of the U.S. Department of Justice prosecutions in 2007 and 2008 shows that crimes that were once national or regional now commonly cross borders and have a transnational impact on businesses and victims.

* Members of an international organized crime group operating a “phishing” scheme in the United States, Canada, Pakistan, Portugal, and Romania obtained private information for credit-card fraud. Among the financial institutions affected were Citibank, Capital One, JPMorgan Chase, Comerica Bank, Wells Fargo, eBay, and PayPal.