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By and Sarah Pulliam Bailey, Three of the four Americans released from Tehran’s Evin Prison on Saturday as part of a prisoner-exchange deal were all men with dual citizenship who traveled to Iran for deeply personal reasons. Amir Mirzaei Hekmati, 32, a former U.S. Marine from Flint, Mich., was visiting an ailing grandmother. Saeed Abedini, 35, an evangelical pastor from Boise, Idaho, was working on building an orphanage with his wife. And Jason Rezaian, 39, a Washington Post reporter raised in Marin County, Calif., was writing about the rapid changes in his father’s homeland, including a surprising new enthusiasm for baseball. The stories of their imprisonment — which collectively spanned about nine years and nine months — captured the public’s attention around the world and created tremendous outrage against Iran. [Post reporter among 4 imprisoned Americans freed in deal with Iran] Little is known about the fourth American, Nosratollah Khosravi-Roodsari, whose detention had not been previously publicized. Iranian state television described him as a businessman. On Saturday, the men’s families expressed their gratitude to the Obama administration for working on the deal, but their statements appeared to be tempered by anxiety and mistrust of the Iranian government. “We thank everyone for your thoughts during this time,” Hekmati’s family said. But, they cautioned, “There are still many unknowns. At this point, we are hoping and praying for Amir’s long-awaited return.” Hekmati is the longest-held American prisoner confirmed to have been held by Iran. Arrested in…